Python Programming Courses to Begin in 2015

December 1, 2014
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Python Programming Courses to Begin in 2015

The details are still falling into place, but CCHS’s first ever Python class is set to open for the 2015 spring semester. Mr. Anthony Beckwith of the Math department, who will be teaching the course, is ecstatic to bring this different type of code to the students of the school. He is experienced in teaching Java; he currently runs two classes on it and he hopes to introduce another one next school year that will cover problem-solving specifically. Beckwith says that Python is an intriguing code language for two primary reasons. First of all, it is generally simpler to learn and use than Java. Java is very complicated, and it is an object-based language, making it very difficult for a beginner to learn it. While Python supports similar styles of object-oriented programming, it is...
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Order, Disorder, and El Sueño de la Razón: Visiting the Goya Exhibit at the MFA

December 1, 2014
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Order, Disorder, and El Sueño de la Razón: Visiting the Goya Exhibit at the MFA

From now until January 19th, a collection of works by Spanish painter Francisco Goya is on exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts. Last week, after a longer-than-we-expected stop by the underground Charlie Card Store, followed by a disappointingly fashionable lunch  at one of the MFA’s kitchenless dining areas, my Grandma and I headed down into the museum basement and found out for ourselves what all of the hype was about. The paintings are organized into different rooms by subject matter, which more or less break down into categories like “portraits of the wealthy,” “the female form,” “el toreo,” and “wiccan ritual.” Most spectacular is Goya’s pequeño self-portrait, which I had the special pleasure of viewing while the patron saint of heavy breathing looked on over my shoulder. Equal parts playful and meticulous, this piece...
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CCHS Building Progresses Rapidly

December 1, 2014
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CCHS Building Progresses Rapidly

Good news everybody!  The new school is on budget and on time to be finished in late winter and for students, staff, and faculty to move in over April vacation.  Workers are in the last stages of construction performing tasks such as finishing the gym floor and installing cabinets. Below are pictures from my most recent tour: For more information visit http://cchsbuilding.org, contact me (nfisher15@colonial.net), or attend the next CCHS Building Committee Meeting.
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The Gluten Trend: Hip or Healthy?

December 1, 2014
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The Gluten Trend: Hip or Healthy?

In the past couple of years, the gluten-free trend seems to have exploded in popularity. Many stores now have aisles or sections dedicated solely to gluten free products. This is, of course, great news for people who have Celiac disease or are sensitive to gluten. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which causes intestinal damage to individuals who consume gluten; however, gluten sensitivity occurs in individuals who do not have Celiac disease, meaning that they cannot fully break down gluten. Given that a third of Americans now avoid gluten, clearly the vast majority of consumption of gluten-free products comes from people who do not undertake a gluten-free diet involuntarily (due to gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease) but do so voluntarily (out of concern for their health). Whether or not gluten poses a risk to individuals who do not...
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A Winter’s Tale: Shakespeare in December At CC

December 1, 2014
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A Winter’s Tale: Shakespeare in December At CC

The following is a stage direction from Shakespeare’s, A Winter’s Tale. Curious as to what this could possibly mean?  You can find out when you come see  A Winter’s Tale, CCHS’s first theatrical production of the year!  Student actors, technicians, and set designers have worked for months memorizing page-long monologues, rehearsing scenes, brushing up their dance steps, and designing beautiful costumes and magnificent sets reflecting Grecian and Indian culture. A Winter’s Tale is the story of two kingdoms, Sicilia and Bohemia, and two kings, King Leontes of Sicilia and King Polixenes of Bohemia.  King Leontes suspects his wife, Hermione, Queen of Sicilia, is having an affair with his good friend Polixenes.  King Leontes is also convinced that Hermione is pregnant with Polixenes’ child and wants desperately to be rid of the...
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Italy in April with Latin!

December 1, 2014
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Italy in April with Latin!

This April vacation, the Latin program is offering an exciting trip to Italy. In correspondence with Latin teacher Ms. Pooler, I learned more about the trip. Twenty-eight students and four CCHS faculty members will be going, including Ms. Pooler, Ms. Volpe, Ms. Mendoza, and Mr. Pavlik. Any student who has previously taken or is currently taking Latin is eligible. The group will be staying in the city of Sorrento for three days, then spending four days in Rome. They will have a busy itinerary, visiting educational and historical sites such as Pompeii and the Naples Archaeological Museum. The students will also be hiking Mt. Vesuvius, the volcano which destroyed Pompeii. There will be a day for exploring the island of Capri where the Roman Emperor Tiberius had a palace. In Rome, the destinations include the Pantheon,...
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Trouble in an Ivy Covered Paradise

December 1, 2014
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Trouble in an Ivy Covered Paradise

  There seems to be trouble in the paradise of the upper-middle class population seeking higher education after high school. Is the dream of the Ivy League education really all that it is cracked up to be? For those who live in the community of Concord-Carlisle High School, there is probably a percentage that would indefinitely answer a concrete “yes” to that question. Without a doubt. Solid head nod. Discussion closed. These Ivy League schools, characterized by the age-old charms of academic rigor, social status, and great promises of success in life, reel in a large number of top students. There must be something magical hidden behind all of that exclusivity, competition, and those high ivy-covered walls. The top schools can act as great motivation to push the student to his or her greatest...
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Why I Stand With Israel

November 24, 2014
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Why I Stand With Israel

(This article is a Guest op-ed submitted by Benjamin Friedman ’15.) Before WWII, to be a Jew in many parts of the world meant to live a life of oppression. In Germany, to be a Jew meant you could so much as look a German in the eye, and he could kill you without consequence. Even my dad, who grew in the sixties and seventies, wasn’t allowed to join his hometown’s country club, simply because he was Jewish. During the Holocaust, six-million Jews were murdered. We’ve all seen the pictures, and many of us have been to the Holocaust museum in D.C. Men, women, children, and infants were gassed, hanged, shot by firing squads, tortured, and forced to work. It was in that moment that the Jewish people learned this: nobody, other than the...
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