“Unbroken”: A Remarkable Read

December 15, 2014
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“Unbroken”: A Remarkable Read

When I was in Barnes and Noble a few weekends ago, I came across an entire table piled high with the book Unbroken, written by Laura Hillenbrand. The name sounded familiar, and a sign read #1 New York Times Bestseller, so I decided to check it out.  When I got home, I started reading and couldn’t stop for six hours straight, maybe a little more after that because I’m not a fast reader. The book was outstanding; I was left speechless at the end. It remarkably captures the true story of Louis Zamperini’s crazy life, which includes running the 5000 meter in the Olympics, flying planes in WWII, and living as a prisoner of war in Japan. The book opened with a preface in which Louis is floating on a life raft in the middle of the Pacific. Having crashed...
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Beyoncé and Chimamanda Adichie

December 15, 2014
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Beyoncé and Chimamanda Adichie

R&B singer-songwriter, dancer, self-described “modern-day feminist”, Beyoncé Giselle Knowles-Carter is, and has been, the hottest name in pop music. Among teenagers, her hit single, “***Flawless” is possibly the most quoted song in a caption of a girl’s profile picture.  The fifth single released from her self-titled album, “Flawless” is delivered on top of a trap-influenced beat. Upon further research, I was surprised to find that in the middle of the track, Knowles’ audio engineer sampled a clip of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s speech, titled, “We should all be feminists.” Adichie is a Nigerian writer, known for creating works that introduce the new generation of readers to African literature. The English curriculum at CCHS includes the study of various African literature, such as Adichie’s Americana and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. In the first week of class this year, we watched a TED talk by Adichie, in...
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Ferguson Protests Close to Home

December 15, 2014
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Ferguson Protests Close to Home

Recently, protestors have taken to the streets to protest the injustices in the Ferguson case. New York, Boston and Washington D.C. have all become hot spots of protests surrounding the charged case of the Ferguson shooting and the Eric Garner choking incident. Although the D.C. and New York protests have garnered the most attention, it is also important to focus on the protests in Boston, which are much closer to home. In Cambridge, countless people ignited a protest to decry the acquittal of Darren Wilson, the police officer who shot Michael Brown. For the most part, the protests came from the Cambridge Latin School, Harvard College and the Harvard Law School. Police estimate that there were about 700 people who were present at the protests. Protestors also expressed indignation at the failure to indict...
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How Not To Read And Why

December 15, 2014
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How Not To Read And Why

Books are one of the oldest forms of communication and expression in human history, and yet there are so few people who still care about them, and really, truly love words, be it verse or prose. People constantly claim that there is no distinction between highbrow and lowbrow art’s value, but is that really true? Absolutely not. The state of reading among adults in America is appalling. Most adults read at an eighth grade level or lower, because they’ve never pushed themselves to read something of value. They read Dan Brown, Danielle Steele, and Stephen King and pride themselves on that. Too often we shift the blame  onto our schools or our culture, and lack of time is a major excuse I’ve heard from many of my fellow students. The truth is that most...
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Patriots for Patriots/Warriors for Warriors Recap

December 15, 2014
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Patriots for Patriots/Warriors for Warriors Recap

Last Saturday the CCHS boys’ and girls’ hockey teams made their season debut in the 3rd annual “Patriots for Patriots/Warriors for Warriors” hockey game at New England Sports Center in Marlboro. The girls’ team played first in a hard-fought battle against the Lincoln-Sudbury girls’ varsity team. CC gave everything it had, but still fell short as the team lost 5-1. Sydney Fischelis ’16 scored a nice goal for Concord. Shortly after the girls, the boys’ varsity team took on LS in a physical matchup. LS went up 4-0 through the first two periods. CC came out for the third period with a lot of passion and energy. The team outplayed LS for the third period, but was unable to put the puck in the net. LS went on to score one more and win...
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A Winter’s Tale Excites

December 8, 2014
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A Winter’s Tale Excites

The Concord-Carlisle Performing Arts Department certainly intends to leave their beloved auditorium with much applause.  They achieved this goal with this weekend’s production of A Winter’s Tale. This story follows the lives of royalty in Sicily, specifically King Leontes’ false accusations about his wife’s infidelity and the illegitimacy of his son.  The repercussions of Leontes’ actions further advance the plot, leading to events such as a trip to Bohemia and festivities at a sheep-shearing party (I won’t divulge anymore so you can enjoy the story for  yourself!) With each show, set designers consistently surprise me with their ability to transform the dingy CCHS auditorium into a detailed setting. For A Winter’s Tale, the stage became a Sicilian Palace as well as a Bohemian Plaza.  I was particularly impressed by the creation of columns from cloth and clever lighting on both the columns and...
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The SAT: Boon or Bane?

December 8, 2014
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The SAT: Boon or Bane?

If you ever asked a high schooler to list all of the stressors in their life, there is a good chance that standardized testing will appear somewhere on that list. Indeed, junior year is the time for the ACT or SAT, and students are gearing up for what many consider to be “high stakes testing.” With many criticizing the value of standardized testing, and questioning whether it has any relevance to high schoolers’ educations, it is important to discuss the necessity of the SAT. Ultimately, the SAT is an ineffective measure of students’ learning. One of the biggest arguments against standardized testing is the simple fact that it often fails to correlate with high school education. Grammar has disappeared from the English curriculum, yet is still tested as the primary factor of the SAT writing. The SAT also offers...
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The SAT: How to Approach Studying for It

December 8, 2014
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The SAT: How to Approach Studying for It

Here are some of my top tips for smart SAT studying: My best advice for everyone when it comes to the SAT is to start early. Many people do not start until their junior year but by that time the stress of studying for school and the SAT becomes a daunting task. Starting in the summer is a great choice for many since the amount of stress is much lower. While it may not sound appealing to study during your summer,  just a few hours a week can make a huge difference. Compared to spending a several hours a day in school, a couple of hours of studying here and there is nothing! I’m not only talking about the summer before junior year – the summer before sophomore year is also a prime time to...
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